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Watering Guidelines for Weber, Davis, Salt Lake & Utah County Lawns

Season Months Guidelines
Spring

March, April,

May

Water 1-2 times per week, depending on temps and rainfall.

Water a total of 25-30 min for fixed, pop-up heads and 50-60 min.

per zone for rotating heads. Monitor your lawn to determine its watering needs.

Early Summer June

Water 2-3 times per week. Water a total of 25-30 min. for fixed,

pop-up heads and 50-60 min per zone for rotating heads.

Summer

July, August,

Early September

During the hot summer months, we recommend watering 3 times a week.

Monitor your lawn and look for “hotspots” or dry areas. Adjust nearby

heads or timer to ensure good coverage. Water a total of 25-30 min

for fixed, pop-up heads and 50-60 min per zone for rotating heads.

Fall

Late September,

October

Water 1-2 times per week, depending on temps and rainfall.

Water a total of 25-30 min for fixed, pop-up heads and 50-60 min.

per zone for rotating heads. Monitor your lawn to determine its watering needs.

 

  • Proper watering is critical to your lawn’s health and vigor. Deep and infrequent watering is the best practice. This means wetting the soil to a depth of 6 inches per irrigation. This equates to a minimum of ½ inch of water each time you irrigate.
  • Water at times of low wind.
  • Water during the very early morning rather than in the afternoon or evening to minimize risk for disease
  • Sprinklers vary in distribution patterns, and require spray overlap for uniform coverage. Place tuna cans or similar straight-sided containers on your lawn to help measure water application rates (you should be getting at least 1/2 inch of water each time you irrigate). Avoid flooding areas or missing other spots. On heavy clay soils and slopes, watch for runoff; it may be necessary for you to apply the “Cycle and Soak” method of watering (see below).
  • To reduce water runoff and to help water penetrate and soak deeply into the soil, we recommend “Cycle and Soak” watering schedule. Instead of watering for a long period of time and allowing the water to runoff into the street, divide the total watering time per zone by 2. Water your lawn using 2 shorter intervals (all in the same morning). For example at 2am, and 4am, before winds pick up. Each cycle, water for 25-30 minutes for rotor heads, 13-15 minutes for stationary pop-ups. These times are averages sampled from other lawns to reach a desired amount of water, which is ½ inch at a time.) Water less in shaded or poorly drained areas.
  • Do not water every day. Frequent, short watering encourages shallow roots, unhealthy grass, plants, and leaves turf susceptible to drought, weeds, and disease.

Symptoms of Drought Stress

Signs that your grass needs water are wilting, change in color to a bluish-grey appearance, or “footprints” left when you walk through your lawn. If conditions worsen, you will begin to see brown spots in your lawn at the weakest points of your watering pattern.

Curing Drought Stress

  • During the heat of the summer, the average lawn will need approximately 1 1/2 to 2 inches of water each week. Try to put down at least a ½ inch of water each time you irrigate. You will want to water long enough each time so that you irrigate the root zone thoroughly (wetting the top 6 inches of the soil). As temperatures reach the 90’s and above, you will likely need to increase watering time.
  • If you have sprinklers that rotate, you should run those sprinklers for at least 50 to 60 minutes per zone each time you irrigate. Popup fixed sprinklers that are none rotating should run for 30 to 40 minutes per zone.
  • Make sure your sprinkler system is working properly and that you have good even coverage in each zone. Adjust sprinklers and/or modify your sprinkler system to correct irregularities. If you choose to hire it out, make certain that the person you hire is truly qualified. As in any industry, there are many claiming to be experts but are not.
  • Mow high. Keep grass at least 3 inches high. Taller grass encourages deeper roots – deeper roots can reach water more effectively. Taller grass also shades soil, which helps reduce water loss, especially during the hot summer months.

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